TrustArc Blog

Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Sabina Jausovec-Salinas, Rackspace US

January 13, 2017

Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this continued series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.   What is your organization’s role in the privacy ecosystem? Rackspace helps businesses tap the power of hosting and cloud computing without the complexity and cost of managing it on their own. As a cloud computing and service company, Rackspace values the trust our customers place in our services. Our role in … Continue reading Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Sabina Jausovec-Salinas, Rackspace US

Privacy Ecosystem Series Review

December 02, 2015

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There are many players in the privacy ecosystem. From regulatory agencies to law firms to technology companies – and each entity plays an essential role in managing the balance between business use of data and consumer data protection.

We began the Privacy Ecosystem Series in July to showcase some of the many people and organizations involved in this fast growing ecosystem. Players range from organizations that enact new regulations to innovators who create compliance management solutions for businesses, and solutions for consumers to manage their privacy preferences.

Check out the Privacy Ecosystem Map to see just how many organizations are involved in shaping data privacy.

Read more “Privacy Ecosystem Series Review”

Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Nuala O’Connor, President & CEO, Center for Democracy & Technology

November 25, 2015

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.

 

How have your organization’s goals/focus changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

CDT’s overall goals have not fundamentally changed over the years. Instead, we’re actually closer to our founding values, which – at their core – have a profound respect for the individual, their personal experience online and their right to speak freely.

New technology emerges every day, and we’re applying the same lens of respecting individual’s dignity to this technology – from drones and audio beacons to the myriad of ways that the Internet of Things (or the Internet of Everything) both makes decisions about individuals and helps to make life more full and efficient.

I think that CDT has evolved in its desire to speak to all members of the community –governments, companies, and individuals – to bring them to the table to discuss respecting human rights online. If anything, CDT’s focus has grown to be more global: we realize that when change to legislation is made in one country, it will have a global ripple effect; we understand the Internet to be global and that global policy must be applied to it; and we believe that the Internet is the greatest loudspeaker ever created.

 

What is the biggest threat to consumers?

The biggest threat to consumers is the opaque collection of data, by which I mean the little bits of data you give out every second of your life and don’t realize.

It’s not the transmission of data – like when you do a Google search or when you’re on Facebook – because you know what data you’re inputting. It’s the data that’s extraneous to the transaction, which includes data that’s collected when you walk down the street or into a store.

The ability to collect granular data about you inside of your own home is a relatively new phenomenon and it stymies notions of your curtilage, your physical boundary around your home. What’s concerning about this data, not only how it’s collected or used by companies you may or may not know, is that decisions are made about you as a result of this data, and you may not be aware whether these decisions are fair, accurate, lasting, or could change how you access services, credit or information.

So it’s not just the data that concerns me but it’s these decisions that may not be at all transparent or apparent to the individual, and they have less control or power in its collection and use.

Read more “Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Nuala O’Connor, President & CEO, Center for Democracy & Technology”

Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Cooper Quintin, Staff Technologist, Electronic Frontier Foundation

October 07, 2015

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy. 

 

What is the role of Privacy Badger in the privacy ecosystem?

Privacy Badger is a browser extension for the Chrome and Firefox that blocks third party trackers which try to spy on your reading habits online. Instead of relying on a blacklist like most other tracker blocking software, Privacy Badger determines what is tracking you as you browse and automatically blocks any new trackers that it sees. Privacy Badger works in conjunction with EFF’s DNT policy–a document that websites can post which contains a promise to not track users who have sent the “Do Not Track” header (which Privacy Badger does.) If a domain has posted the DNT Policy, Privacy Badger will not block it.

 

What key goals/issues is Privacy Badger focused on tackling?

The key goal of Privacy Badger is to bring an end to non-consensual tracking as the primary business model for the web. Through a combination of the DNT Policy and Privacy Badger we would like to encourage content providers and ad tech companies to shift away from a business model that relies on tracking and toward one that protects individuals’ privacy. We can do that by rewarding the companies that protect individual privacy and blocking the ones that don’t.

 

How have EFF’s goals/focus as an organization changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

EFF has always been a staunch supporter of civil liberties and the right to privacy. Early on, we were a part of the W3C Do Not Track Working Group. We tried to help steer that group in a direction that would result in a strong DNT policy. We felt that the results of that working group were unsatisfactory in that they did not go far enough in protecting the users. We then switched focus to creating our own stronger version of the DNT policy, and the technology–Privacy Badger–to back it up.

Read more “Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Cooper Quintin, Staff Technologist, Electronic Frontier Foundation”

Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: David Longford, CEO, DataGuidance

September 30, 2015

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.  

 

What is your organization’s role in the privacy ecosystem?

DataGuidance is a hub of data privacy intelligence, sourced from the world’s most renowned experts in 170+ countries. Our role in the privacy ecosystem is to be the global centre for information on privacy, whether it’s giving access to relevant laws, local ‘best-practice’ or allowing people to compare requirements in multiple jurisdictions.

 

What key goals/issues is your organization focused on tackling?

The primary goal is giving first-class support to privacy teams, which we know can be hugely diverse. They need the best information possible, so it is a huge responsibility. We talk to the privacy community all the time, so that we can deliver information and innovative tools that help people solve the day-to-day issues they face.

We’ve been hearing a lot from our clients regarding the practical difficulties they’ve been facing with regards to employee monitoring. As a result, we did a lot work around this and developed a specific tool to help privacy pros understand the legal requirements they are faced with. It’s an issue that touches a nerve with everyone, as there are so many valid and complex needs to satisfy from each stakeholder. For me, it’s an issue that embodies privacy’s importance to businesses, societies and citizens, so it’s crucial we all get it right.

Aside from that, probably the biggest on the horizon is the GDPR, how organisations can compare EU and global requirements; we’ve got lots of very exciting plans for that. In addition, we continually see issues surrounding data transfers, breach notification, direct marketing, data retention and consent; the list goes on!

 

How have your organization’s goals/focus changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

We’re living through an incredible period, in terms of how technology is changing the world. One major consequence of technological change that I’ve noticed over the last few years is how businesses speak about customer experience. Like the best internet companies, we put a huge focus on making sure people get value every time they login to DataGuidance.

Technology is constantly driving up expectations; the fact that people have 24/7 access to apps with fantastic functionality mean that our own product needs to constantly evolve. In short, today’s privacy professionals expect to quickly find valuable information that helps them do their job better.

Read more “Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: David Longford, CEO, DataGuidance”

Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Blane Sims, Senior Vice President of Product, Signal

September 25, 2015

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.  

 

What is your organization’s role in the privacy ecosystem?

Marketing is a data-driven industry. But the technology that digital marketers have relied on for 20 years haven’t kept pace with all the complexity and fragmentation of today’s landscape. Signal helps advertisers and publishers collect, unify and activate their cross-channel data to deliver real-time, people-based marketing. An important part of powering people-based marketing is solving fundamental privacy and data collection challenges.

I have yet to talk to a marketer who wants to do anything other than provide amazing experiences to customers. Doing things that customers find privacy-invasive is simply incompatible with providing an amazing experience. That’s the challenge we’re focused on: helping brands to recognize and understand their always-on customers so they can delight them with truly engaging experiences — while always respecting their privacy choices.

 

What key goals/issues is your organization focused on tackling?

One of the big issues we’re working on right now is helping consumers set privacy preferences that are both durable and user-friendly. This is challenging in a cross-channel environment, where the patchwork of technology platforms has resulted in a patchwork of privacy settings that is confusing for consumers. The various systems don’t talk to each other, and opt-in and opt-out settings are buried inside of the browser or inside of your smartphone.

From a technology standpoint, Signal is focused on enabling data collection from any channel or device. We are committed to developing better privacy solutions, so we don’t limit our perspective to what you can do with cookies. But trying to move things forward is not always easy in an ecosystem with so much fragmentation.

“Privacy by design” is one of Signal’s founding principles. Privacy by design means that our platform was architected with certain values in mind: we don’t collect personally-identifiable information; we don’t co-mingle one brand’s consumer data with another’s; and we provide tools that give consumers transparency and choice regarding the collection and use of data. We hold these principles near and dear because Signal’s goal is to generate more trust and transparency around the data that’s being collected and shared across the desktop, mobile, email, point-of-sale and other channels.

Read more “Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Blane Sims, Senior Vice President of Product, Signal”

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